In the Shed

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She rounded the corner and held her nose, trying to escape the smell. They’d have to clear this place out, she thought, sighing. A grimy toilet was inside the tiny shed.

She rolled up her sleeves, then paused. Maybe she’d ask her husband to do it. She hated cleaning out things and with her allergies, it was even worse.

She was about to turn back, when something caught her eye. She stepped inside the shed, looking into the dark space behind the toilet. She sucked in a breath.

There, lying in the corner, was the corpse of her long-lost son.

© 2017 *edited version*

Friday Fictioneers, 1 December 2017

A Lesson in Organic Writing by Steven James

Have you ever tried to write a thriller organically?

I’ve been mulling over mine for quite a bit now and I can never figure out how to keep the plot moving and fresh.

Reading this article by Steven James has been an eye-opener. He uses only these four questions, when he feels he gets stuck on the plot:

  1. “What would this character naturally do?”
  2. “How can I make things worse?”
  3. “How can I include a twist?”
  4. “What promises have I made as a writer that I have not yet kept?”

And somehow they lead to new plot points, new ideas that can be developed further as the novel progresses.

If you want to read more about writing organically, follow the link to the article, where Steven James explains how he used his questions to write his own novel, Every Deadly Kiss.

https://www.criminalelement.com/blogs/2017/07/a-lesson-in-organic-writing